Sticky: Published in A List Apart

Many of the best practices we take for granted today were first advanced as humble ideas on A List Apart. I have been reading ALA since I first became interested in HTML, so I’m thrilled to say that I’ve finally had an article published there. It was really cool to go through the editorial process, starting with a quick pitch, moving on to formal acceptance, and then many rounds of edits with the amazingly patient Sara Wachter-Boetcher.

Also amazing: House illustrator Kevin Cornell retired from ALA after my article — I literally got the last issue of Cornell’s!

WordPress Plugin to Log JS Errors in a Page

At my day job, we’re looking at a way to migrate a large number of sites from an outdated WordPress install to a current one. I believe that our biggest problem with be the differing versions of jQuery. To that end, I created this plugin, to log JavaScript errors to a page.

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WordPress JSON Rest API Shortcode & Tutorial

They say you’re supposed to write with one specific person in mind, instead of writing for everyone. In this case, I’m writing for, well, me. Specifically, me before I spent about 4 hours hello-worlding the new WordPress JSON Rest API yesterday. I found the existing documentation to be a little too advanced, or vague, for my humble skill set. To that end, I’ve written a shortcode to bundle up what I learned and to help you hello-world it yourself:

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Making a “Skip To Content” Link in WordPress

A “skip to content” link is a link, typically hidden from view, usually at the very top of the page source, to navigate directly to the main content of the page. There’s one on this very blog! You can see it if you view source, and you can also see it if you tab to it, as per wp.org accessibility guidelines. There are a few different components that make this happen, which I’ll explain in this post.

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Get WordPress to use image EXIF date as post_date for Attachments

By default, when you upload a media item, WordPress makes that a post of the ‘attachment’ post_type, giving it a post_date of whenever you upload it. Instead, you might want it to use the EXIF date for that image. In this post, I’ll walk through how to do that.

There are two steps we need to complete:

  1. Get the EXIF date.
  2. Get WordPress to use the EXIF date instead of the current time when saving the attachment for this first time.

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